Hans Bellmer, Unica Tied, 1959

Hans Bellmer, Unica Tied, 1959

(Source: latenebreuse)

Reblogged from aubreylstallard with 592 notes

societalvengeance:

from jacques penry’s guide to facial identification - ‘looking at faces and remembering them’

societalvengeance:

from jacques penry’s guide to facial identification - ‘looking at faces and remembering them

Reblogged from drktropical with 252 notes

Reblogged from scarymansion with 35 notes

likeafieldmouse:

Gerold Miller - Monoform (2014)

Reblogged from likeafieldmouse with 637 notes

Reblogged from 5kin with 124,322 notes


Foamcore

Foamcore

(Source: nevver)

Reblogged from aubreylstallard with 8,794 notes

"He make my pussy sing, “Ahhhhh!” like it’s Mozart. He say the pussy pretty; it look like show art. He say, “Who pussy is it?” And I say, “Yours.” And when he spank this, I make that pussy fart. I’m such an actress - Melissa Joan Hart."

Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged  (via teacakes)

Reblogged from teacakes with 38 notes

malformalady:

From the cliffs of a village in Papua New Guinea’s highlands, are the stained and charred corpses of the Anga people. In these remote parts of the country, it is the highest honour they can bestow on their dead. First, experienced embalmers make cuts in the feet, knees and elbows of the cadavers, to allow body fat to drain away, before jabbing bamboo poles into their guts and collecting the drippings. These are smeared onto the skin and hair of surviving relatives in a ritual believed to transfer the strength of the dead into the living. Any leftovers are used as cooking oil, for the same reason. They then sew shut the eyes, mouth and anus of the body their working on, to reduce the air intake in an attempt to prevent flesh from rotting. The soles of the feet, palms of the hands and tongue are sliced off and presented to the surviving spouse and then what’s left of the body is smoke cured over a fire pit, before being coated in clay and ochre to deter scavengers. The cliffs of the Morobe highlands are littered with these corpses, some dating back 200 years of more. They are sometimes brought down for special events and celebrations, and returned soon after.
Photo credit: (top)Michael Thirnbeck, (bottom)Getty Images/Lonely Planet Images

malformalady:

From the cliffs of a village in Papua New Guinea’s highlands, are the stained and charred corpses of the Anga people. In these remote parts of the country, it is the highest honour they can bestow on their dead. First, experienced embalmers make cuts in the feet, knees and elbows of the cadavers, to allow body fat to drain away, before jabbing bamboo poles into their guts and collecting the drippings. These are smeared onto the skin and hair of surviving relatives in a ritual believed to transfer the strength of the dead into the living. Any leftovers are used as cooking oil, for the same reason. They then sew shut the eyes, mouth and anus of the body their working on, to reduce the air intake in an attempt to prevent flesh from rotting. The soles of the feet, palms of the hands and tongue are sliced off and presented to the surviving spouse and then what’s left of the body is smoke cured over a fire pit, before being coated in clay and ochre to deter scavengers. The cliffs of the Morobe highlands are littered with these corpses, some dating back 200 years of more. They are sometimes brought down for special events and celebrations, and returned soon after.

Photo credit: (top)Michael Thirnbeck, (bottom)Getty Images/Lonely Planet Images

Reblogged from rosievandoll with 758 notes

(Source: mftb)

Reblogged from 5kin with 307 notes

(Source: fatal-rendezvous)

Reblogged from trancevestite with 1,758 notes